description
ERBB4, also known as HER4, belongs to the ERBB family of receptors, which also includes ERBB1 (EGFR i.e. HER1), ERBB2 (HER2 i.e. NEU) and ERBB3 (HER3). Similar to EGFR, ERBB4 has an extracellular ligand binding domain, a single transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic domain which contains an active tyrosine kinase and a C-tail with multiple phosphorylation sites. At least three and possibly four splicing isoforms of ERBB4 exist that differ in their C-tail and/or the extracellular juxtamembrane regions: ERBB4 JM-A CYT1, ERBB4 JM-A CYT2 and ERBB4 JM-B CYT1 (the existence of ERBB4 JM-B CYT2 has not been confirmed). ERBB4 becomes activated by binding one of its seven ligands, three of which, HB-EGF, epiregulin EPR and betacellulin BTC, are EGF-like (Elenius et al. 1997, Riese et al. 1998), while four, NRG1, NRG2, NRG3 and NRG4, belong to the neuregulin family (Tzahar et al. 1994, Carraway et al. 1997, Zhang et al. 1997, Hayes et al. 2007). Upon ligand binding, ERBB4 forms homodimers (Sweeney et al. 2000) or it heterodimerizes with ERBB2 (Li et al. 2007). Dimers of ERBB4 undergo trans-autophosphorylation on tyrosine residues in the C-tail (Cohen et al. 1996, Kaushansky et al. 2008, Hazan et al. 1990, Li et al. 2007), triggering downstream signaling cascades. The pathway Signaling by ERBB4 only shows signaling by ERBB4 homodimers. Signaling by heterodimers of ERBB4 and ERBB2 is shown in the pathway Signaling by ERBB2. Ligand-stimulated ERBB4 is also able to form heterodimers with ligand-stimulated EGFR (Cohen et al. 1996) and ligand-stimulated ERBB3 (Riese et al. 1995). Dimers of ERBB4 with EGFR and dimers of ERBB4 with ERBB3 were demonstrated in mouse cell lines in which human ERBB4 and EGFR or ERBB3 were exogenously expressed. These heterodimers undergo trans-autophosphorylation, but their downstream signaling and physiological significance have not been studied. All splicing isoforms of ERBB4 possess two tyrosine residues in the C-tail that serve as docking sites for SHC1 (Kaushansky et al. 2008, Pinkas-Kramarski et al. 1996, Cohen et al. 1996). Once bound to ERBB4, SHC1 becomes phosphorylated on tyrosine residues by the tyrosine kinase activity of ERBB4, which enables it to recruit the complex of GRB2 and SOS1, resulting in the guanyl-nucleotide exchange on RAS and activation of RAF and MAP kinase cascade (Kainulainen et al. 2000). The CYT1 isoforms of ERBB4 also possess a C-tail tyrosine residue that, upon trans-autophosphorylation, serves as a docking site for the p85 alpha subunit of PI3K (Kaushansky et al. 2008, Cohen et al. 1996), leading to assembly of an active PI3K complex that converts PIP2 to PIP3 and activates AKT signaling (Kainulainen et al. 2000). Besides signaling as a transmembrane receptor, ligand activated homodimers of ERBB4 JM-A isoforms (ERBB4 JM-A CYT1 and ERBB4 JM-A CYT2) undergo proteolytic cleavage by ADAM17 (TACE) in the juxtamembrane region, resulting in shedding of the extracellular domain and formation of an 80 kDa membrane bound ERBB4 fragment known as ERBB4 m80 (Rio et al. 2000, Cheng et al. 2003). ERBB4 m80 undergoes further proteolytic cleavage, mediated by the gamma-secretase complex, which releases the soluble 80 kDa ERBB4 intracellular domain, known as ERBB4 s80 or E4ICD, into the cytosol (Ni et al. 2001). ERBB4 s80 is able to translocate to the nucleus, promote nuclear translocation of various transcription factors, and act as a transcription co-factor. In neuronal precursors, ERBB4 s80 binds the complex of TAB and NCOR1, helps to move the complex into the nucleus, and is a co-factor of TAB:NCOR1-mediated inhibition of expression of astrocyte differentiation genes GFAP and S100B (Sardi et al. 2006). In mammary cells, ERBB4 s80 recruits STAT5A transcription factor in the cytosol, shuttles it to the nucleus, and acts as the STAT5A co-factor in binding to and promoting transcription from the beta-casein (CSN2) promoter, and may be involved in the regulation of other lactation-related genes (Williams et al. 2004, Muraoka-Cook et al. 2008). ERBB4 s80 was also shown to bind activated estrogen receptor in the nucleus and act as its transcriptional co-factor in promoting transcription of some estrogen-regulated genes, such as progesterone receptor gene NR3C3 and CXCL12 i.e. SDF1 (Zhu et al. 2006). The C-tail of ERBB4 possesses several WW-domain binding motifs (three in CYT1 isoform and two in CYT2 isoform), which enable interaction of ERBB4 with WW-domain containing proteins. ERBB4 s80, through WW-domain binding motifs, interacts with YAP1 transcription factor, a known proto-oncogene, and may be a co-regulator of YAP1-mediated transcription (Komuro et al. 2003, Omerovic et al. 2004). The tumor suppressor WWOX, another WW-domain containing protein, competes with YAP1 in binding to ERBB4 s80 and prevents translocation of ERBB4 s80 to the nucleus (Aqeilan et al. 2005). ERBB4 s80 is also able to translocate to the mitochondrial matrix, presumably when its nuclear translocation is inhibited. Once in the mitochondrion, the BH3 domain of ERBB4, characteristic of BCL2 family members, may enable it to act as a pro-apoptotic factor (Naresh et al. 2006). Activation of ERBB4 in breast cancer cell lines leads to JNK-dependent increase in BRCA1 mRNA level and mitotic cell cycle delay, but the exact mechanism has not been elucidated (Muraoka-Cook et al. 2006). WW-domain binding motifs in the C-tail of ERBB4 play an important role in the downregulation of ERBB4 receptor signaling, enabling the interaction of intact ERBB4, ERBB4 m80 and ERBB4 s80 with NEDD4 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases WWP1 and ITCH. The interaction of WWP1 and ITCH with intact ERBB4 is independent of receptor activation and autophosphorylation. Binding of WWP1 and ITCH ubiquitin ligases leads to ubiquitination of ERBB4 and its cleavage products, and subsequent degradation through both proteasomal and lysosomal routes (Omerovic et al. 2007, Feng et al. 2009). In addition, the s80 cleavage product of ERBB4 JM-A CYT-1 isoform is the target of NEDD4 ubiquitin ligase. NEDD4 binds ERBB4 JM-A CYT-1 s80 (ERBB4jmAcyt1s80) through its PIK3R1 interaction site and mediates ERBB4jmAcyt1s80 ubiquitination, thereby decreasing the amount of ERBB4jmAcyt1s80 that reaches the nucleus (Zeng et al. 2009)

external resources
NCBI:1269496
REACTOME:R-HSA-1236394
PUBMED:9275162
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genes
BTC , CSN2 , HBEGF , EGF , EGFR , ERBB3 , ERBB4 , EREG , ESR1 , GFAP , GRB2 , NRG1 , HRAS , KRAS , NEDD4 , NRAS , PGR , PIK3CA , PIK3R1 , PSEN2 , RPS27A , S100B , CXCL12 , SHC1 , SOS1 , STAT5A , ADAM17 , UBA52 , UBB , UBC , NRG2 , NCOR1 , YAP1 , NRG3 , WWP1 , TAB2 , NCSTN , APH1A , WWOX , PSENEN , APH1B , ITCH , NRG4 ,